Relentless and Tragic Marketing: Psychiatric Drugs from Before the Cradle to the Grave

by John Breeding, PhD and Amy Philo

Working with others, we strive to alleviate distress and to support and enhance the personal growth, transformation, individuation, self-determination, and clear and expanded awareness of individuals. Necessity dictates that we also spend a lot of time challenging aspects of the mental health profession that do the opposite—creating more distress, suppressing growth and transformation, violating self-determination, and dulling and blinding awareness. We call it psychiatric oppression, the systematic, institutionalized mistreatment of those judged as “mentally ill.” This essay focuses especially on the ever expanding encroachment of psychiatric oppression to more and more of the population, and to individuals who are less and less in need of actual help. This encroachment takes the form of mass marketing for psychiatry and the pharmaceutical industry. One key aspect of oppression theory is the claim to virtue. For psychiatric oppression that claim is the notion that mentally ill people need their treatment; its growing extension is the concept of prevention, that potentially mentally ill people need treatment as well!

The Regressive Progression: Treatment to Prevention

“An ounce of prevention is a pound of cure.” Like all great aphorisms, this one, often associated with Ben Franklin, holds wisdom and is partly true, based on assumption. In this case, one must assume the role of victim of unnecessary malady that necessitates a cure…and that there is a felt connection or empathic relatedness to the one who suffers malady. Where these assumptions are not met, the aphorism is false. To wit, for the giant corporation of Halliburton and its government and military operations group, or for the mercenary army of Blackwater, going to war is worth a great deal more than diplomacy.

Continue reading “Relentless and Tragic Marketing: Psychiatric Drugs from Before the Cradle to the Grave”

Year End, New Year in Review


The MOTHERS Act in Health Care Bill Heads To Final Negotiations & Susan Stone’s False Statement About Melanie Stokes

Why The MOTHERS Act Should Not Become Law


Go directly to the FDA web comment page about electroshock here:

At least say:

“I oppose the FDA’s proposed reclassification of the ECT device to
Class II. The FDA should investigate the ECT device for safety and
effectiveness. The FDA should call for Pre-Market Approval
Applications for the device.”

Electroshock Survivor Leonard Roy Frank to FDA: Case Against ECT

FDA – “Yes Man” to Electroshock?

Pharmalot’s take on the new study on meds during pregnancy being initiated by the FDA and others (FDA to look at medication safety during pregnancy)

Motherhood is Not A Medical Disorder, one of the top posts of the year on Psychiatrist Dr. Doug Bremner’s blog Before You Take That Pill.

Antidepressants no more effective than a sugar pill

Before You Take That Antidepressant, Visit This Website (Op Ed News Re: SSRI Stories)

Ritalin Use Linked With 500% Increase in Sudden Death of Children

Psychiatrist Under Federal Investigation After Writing 96,685 psych drug prescriptions- about 153 per day

Advocates Want New Rules to Protect Nursing Home Patients from Abuse with Antipsychotics



No Elder Neuro-lept Behind – Shrinks Increasingly Prescribe Antipsychotics

Despite voluminous warnings on the health dangers of antipsychotic drugs  – the use is increasing. Who prescribes antipsychotic drugs?   Mainly – psychiatrists:  “The study, which looked at visits to pediatricians and other doctors, found that psychiatrists were the most likely to prescribe antipsychotic drugs.” New York Times, June 6, 2006 
Bay News 9 (Tampa) Video: com/watch? v=pIkJZlJljD4   August 25, 2008

Antipsychotic Drug Use Up in Elderly Despite Warnings
August 25, 2008

MONDAY, Aug. 25  — Safety warnings slowed the use of antipsychotic drugs in seniors with dementia. But the overall use of the drugs in the elderly increased, a finding which suggests that warnings may not be sufficient to protect patients, Canadian researchers say.

Between late 2002 and June 2005, Health Canada issued three warnings that three new atypical antipsychotic drugs increased the risk of stroke and death in elderly patients with dementia.

The researchers analyzed prescription drug data in the province of Ontario and found that antipsychotic drug use among the elderly increased 20 percent from the month prior to the first warning in September 2002 to February 2007. About 70 percent of the seniors receiving antipsychotic drugs lived in nursing homes, and about 40 percent of them were 85 or older.

“This finding highlights the limited impact of warnings and suggests that more effective approaches are needed to protect vulnerable populations from potentially hazardous medications, ” wrote Dr. Geoffrey Anderson, of the University of Toronto, and colleagues.

The study was published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Story link here: http://health. articles/ health/healthday /2008/08/ 25/antipsychotic -drug-use- up-in-elderly- despite.html