Petition for: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to hold followup ADHD Consensus Conference in 2013

Posted by Maria Mangicaro
Psychologist Dr. Michael Gilbert has started a petition at

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH): Hold ADHD Consensus Conference in 2013: A follow-up to 1998 Conference.

Click here to sign the petition.

Created By Michael Gilbert PsyD Syracuse, NY

Why This Is Important

It is essential that ADHD is revisited by an objective panel with an honest review of the SCIENCE and not clouded by FIANCIAL, POLITICAL, OR SPECIAL INTERESTS  in order to examine the following:

1. do we have scientific evidence to support the validity of disorder

2. what is the long-term efficacy and satety of medications

3. what alternative factors (e.g., trauma, toxins, ineffective parenting/educational approaches, temperament) contribute to the development of ADHD behaviors

4. what non-medication approaches are available that safe and effective for improving social-emotional/behavioral wellness, including ADHD behavior (inattention, impulsivity, hyperactivitiy).

5. should ADHD remain under OHI of IDEA in educational system or is there a better way to meet children’s educational needs.

Youtube Credits:  Uploaded by   on Mar 25, 2006


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A New Approach to Improving Social-Emotional, Behavioral, and Mental Wellness


A two-day symposium for clinicians, educators, researchers, students, and parents.

Experts will present on topics such as:








Friday 9/28/2012  Hutchings Psychiatric Center

Saturday 9/29/2012  Crowne Plaza Syracuse

If Pharma Made Trikes – “Buyer Beware”

After 10 injuries were reported, a 2010 recall of over 7 million trikes manufactured by Fisher Price took place.  It seems as if some manufacturers have come a long way and child safety standards are a top priority.  For the pharmaceutical industry, should we continue to accept “buyer beware” as the standard?

By Maria Mangicaro

Dr. David Healy’s recent post, “If Pharma Made Cars“,  crafts several very clever analogies regarding mandatory compliance of consumer safety regulations imposed on the auto and airline industries, as compared with the safety expectations of products manufactured by the tobacco and the pharmaceutical industries. [1]

Healy’s points are well made and by further exploring various concepts of consumer protection,  his analogies become much more multi-faceted for mental health consumers, advocates and lawmakers to consider.

By far, the U.S. is the global leader in the consumer protection movement.  The Consumer Bill of Rights includes eight specific guarantees:  the right to satisfaction of basic needs, the right to safety, the right to be informed, the right to choose, the right to be heard, the right to redress, the right to consumer education, and the right to a healthy environment. [2]

U.S. consumers are protected against deceptive business practices by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).  The FTC acts to protect consumers, prevent fraud and maintain competition in the marketplace.  The FTC vision is stated as:

“A U.S. economy characterized by vigorous competition among producers and consumer access to accurate information, yielding high-quality products at low prices and encouraging efficiency, innovation, and consumer choice.“[3]

The characteristics of the mental health care system deprive many individuals of this “vision” and consumerism, which in some cases is forced, is concentrated on the purchases of psychiatric services and pharmaceutical products.

 A recent resolution introduced in the Illinois House of Representatives by Rep. Mary Flowers (D-Chicago), calling for the establishment of a “Task Force on Mental Diagnosis and Illinois Law“, may help break apart psychiatry’s “monopoly of the mental illness epidemic“.   Click here to read more.

Continue reading “If Pharma Made Trikes – “Buyer Beware””